Archives: authors

10 Queer Writers from History

10 Queer Writers from History

One thing many people decry these days is how many “queers” there appear to be. From the militant extremists to closeted homophobes and people who allegedly don’t care, the sentiment is often that there must be something going on! There must be some reason why all these people are “turning” queer. Why, just look at history! Nobody was queer back then.

 

Except, well, no. They totally were and we always have been. While cultural conceptions of “queer” have changed over time and most of the people on this list wouldn’t have understood themselves in quite the same terms we use today, the fact of the matter is people have always been queer.

Should Authors Write Reviews?

I recently finished reading my first book of the year. It’s the first book I’ve read solely for pleasure in a long time. Knowing the importance of being a reader as the foundations of being a writer, getting back to reading after an almost decade-long hiatus has been high on my to-do list. I was delighted to get back to reading, and I truly enjoyed the story.

How Much Tech Does an Author Need?

How Much Tech Does an Author Need?

These days, it seems like everyone fancies themselves an author—and who wouldn’t? With advances in technology, self-publishing has never been easier or cheaper. A process that once cost tens of thousands of dollars now costs next to nothing if you want it to. You can literally write something in Word, hit a button, and boom-bang, you’ve got yourself a book.
Can Men Write Female Characters?

Can Men Write Female Characters?

Ahhhh, I love the smell of misconceptions in the morning. One of the common ones in the world of writing is that if you’re not x, you can’t write about x.
I saw this crop up again the other day. The author expressed the sentiment that men aren’t “allowed” to write female characters any more. The argument is men have reductionist understanding of women. Since they’ve never experienced the world as a woman, they can only write through tropes and stereotyping. Any female character a man writes would either be a misogynistic interpretation or a fetishized, sexualized female object there for male pleasure.