Player Profile: Symon Tremblay

Symon Tremblay is a Canadian hockey player, currently playing for the Washington Stars of the IHA.

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Writer’s Insights: Weasel Words

All writers have them. They go by many different names. You may not even notice them at first. They pretend to be your friends, but they’re not. They’re actually your worst enemies. No, I’m not talking about inner demons. I’m talking about weasel words.

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Readers Do Notice

One thing I often hear from people is spelling and grammar don’t really matter. This is usually the argument they present when they’ve been caught out for making a mistake or not knowing. “What does it matter?” they ask. “You know what I mean.”

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The Basics of English: Word Categories

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Words Mean Things: Editing

Quick: What’s the difference between “editing” and “proofreading”?

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Chapter 27: Law and Disorder [Slapshot!]

Luke pinched the bridge of his nose. “What is your shit doing here, Sean?”

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Chapter 28: The Feeling of Failure [Slapshot!]

Mason woke up with the sun burning into his eyes; they’d left the curtains open last night. He winced, dragged an arm over his eyes. The sheets were soft, blindingly white in the sunshine, the small shadows cast in the valleys of their rumples not enough to dull the glare. Beside him, Linnea shifted, rolled […]

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Six WordBird Tips for Self-Editing

Have you taken a look at your NaNoWriMo project since you finished it on November 30? Setting a manuscript aside is a great first step. You’ve probably found yourself wondering, “What next?” Someone will almost inevitably suggest publishing it or looking for an agent. Someone might say you want or need to get it edited.

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Profile: Jake Watson

Jacob (Jake) Watson is a professional hockey player currently playing for the Washington Stars of the IHA. Watson is considered one of the best American defensemen currently playing, and has been named to the US national team several times.

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Writer’s Insights: Using Dialogue Tags Effectively

He said, she said. We’ve all been there, haven’t we? You’re reading a book and you’re suddenly struck by the utter repetitiveness of the dialogue tags. Every other line seems to have the word “said.”

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